Wednesday, October 20, 2021

Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2) :

๐Ÿ‘‰ Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 1)

Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2) :

Despite the associated discomfort, DOMS is often regarded as a necessary part of exercise. For many, being sore creates the feeling that something's "happening" to their body-that they really accomplished something during their workout. And, on the surface, DOMS would seem to play at least some role in generating a training effect. Since DOMS is related to muscle damage and muscle damage is believed to initiate the growth process, it should therefore follow that DOMS promotes muscular development. Makes sense, right?

The truth is, however, DOMS is not a prerequisite for muscular strength or hypertrophy. Some of the biggest bodybuilders in the world never get sore following a workout, yet proceed to grow bigger every year; world-class powerlifters regularly increase the amount of their lifts without a hint of muscular soreness; and most advanced trainees continue to make fine progress in the absence of any appreciable DOMS. Studies on concentric training firmly support these observations. Research shows that concentric-only exercise results in significant increases in lean muscle tissue . Why is this relevant? Well, given the fact that DOMS is induced mainly from eccentric, not concentric, training, the natural conclusion is that soreness doesn't necessarily equate with progress.



So what is the low down on DOMS? When all is said and done, it's merely an indicator of tissue trauma-nothing more, nothing less. In the initial stages of training, the stimulus of exercise is a shock to your neuromuscular system. Your body doesn't know how to react to this stimulus and the chain of events leading to muscular soreness is set into motion.

But the human body is a very adaptive organism. It readily adjusts to the rigors of intense exercise-even after only a single bout of training . The muscles, connective tissue and the immune system become increasingly efficient in dealing with fiber-related damage. Various physiologic and structural adaptations take place that gradually attenuates any post-exercise effects. Generally speaking, the more that you participate in regular exercise, the greater your resistance to muscle soreness.

๐Ÿ‘‰ Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 3)

Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2) Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2) Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2) Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2) Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2) Understanding Exercise-Induced Muscle Soreness (Part 2)



No comments: