Sunday, November 28, 2021

Exercise, A Successful Plan : Warm Up, Cool Down and Stretching

Warm Up, Cool Down and Stretching :

Warming  up and stretching are essential, but they are not the same thing and  should not be done at the same time. Warming up is as simple as a slow  easy walk for ten minutes. It is necessary in order to prepare the body  for exercise. Warming up should always be done first. Once exercise  begins, the metabolic by-products (toxins) of muscle activity need  somewhere to go. Warming up ensures that a sufficient amount of blood  is circulating prior to exercise, so that these by-products can be  carried away to the liver for detoxification and elimination. Warming  up also increases the amount of free-floating fatty acids available for  fuel - our desired energy source. Also, up to 80% of the blood in the  organs will be transferred to the muscles during stressful activity.  Warming up allows for this to happen slowly and gradually, decreasing  the overall amount of tissue stress. Ten to fifteen minutes is all that  is required for a proper warm up period.

After  a brief warm up period, stretching may be performed. The added  circulation from the warm up period allows for greater elasticity and  flexibility of the tissues during a stretch, both of which decrease the  chance for injury. Do not stretch through the point of pain and do not  bounce when you stretch. Stretching beyond the normal range of motion  may temporarily increase flexibility, but it also leads to micro  injury. The best form of stretching is a static-active stretch. This  means that you perform a light stretch, moving slowly to a point of  resistance, and contract the opposite muscle for 10-20 seconds. For  example, if you want to stretch the muscles on the back of the right  leg, mildly contract the muscles on the front of the right leg for  about 20 seconds.



The  cool down is just as important as the warm up. Cooling down allows a  gentle return of the blood to the various organs. If we stop suddenly  after exercise, the blood rushes too quickly into the organs, bringing  with it the many chemical waste products that were produced. Since most  of our blood is stored in the organs when we are not active, many of  the chemical waste products will be trapped there as well. This leads  to chemical stress and potential toxic buildup. If severe enough, all  the aerobic benefits from the exercise can be lost. Also, the cool down  is the first stage of the post-exercise recovery. Recovery from  exercise is just as important as the exercise itself. Simply go  gradually slower than the exercise pace until your heart rate is about  10 - 20 beats above your resting heart rate. This should only take  about ten minutes and is all that is needed.

You  will begin to get to know more about your body and its specific needs  before, during and after exercise. Always try to "tune in" to what is  going on in your tissues as you exercise. The body gives us many  warning signs; we need only to pay attention and heed its call.

 

๐Ÿ‘‰ What Is Exercise?
๐Ÿ‘‰ What Is The Best Exercise For Our Bodies?
๐Ÿ‘‰ Fitness vs. Health.
๐Ÿ‘‰ The Anaerobic System.
๐Ÿ‘‰ The Aerobic System.
๐Ÿ‘‰ Exercise Goals.
๐Ÿ‘‰ How to Start.
๐Ÿ‘‰ Target Heart Rate.
๐Ÿ‘‰ Without A Heart Rate Monitor.
๐Ÿ‘‰ What to Expect.
๐Ÿ‘‰ Selecting a Program.
๐Ÿ‘‰ The Emotional Component.
๐Ÿ‘‰ Warm Up, Cool Down and Stretching.
๐Ÿ‘‰ Maximum Aerobic Function Test (MAF).
๐Ÿ‘‰ Summary.
๐Ÿ‘‰ When to Add Other Exercises.

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